Divide and conquer

Divide and conquer

When I met Ed Sheeran with his debut album, "+", I convinced myself that it would be the Golden Boy that the British had been looking forward to for years. I was not wrong, the success of that first album was probably unexpected for him. Everyone wondered who that boy was who masterfully sensitized issues that could reach the hearts of people of any age and culture. A guitar and an effects processor to sequence the accompaniment of their songs and, above all, lyrics. Yes lyrics, things to say, stories to tell. And well, anyone can tell me that almost all popular songs contain lyrics, but come on, what they say! In contrast, Ed Sheeran was willing to conquer the hearts of music lovers through all his senses and not resorting to the simple formula of a contagious rhythm, an inconsequential letter, everything in the blender and voila! We have a success. No, the commitment of the one born in London in 1991 with the name of Edward Christopher Sheeran was, rather than with anything else, with himself. Faithful to his style, but, above all, true to his convictions, we come to the moment of "÷". An album that shows us the maturity of a determined musician not to betray his essence but convinced that he has to move forward in the same line so as not to stagnate and end up in oblivion. Artists like him, rarely appear, so we must take advantage of every last drop of creativity that comes from his songs and, above all, enrich our taste for reading and poetry with his lyrics. Ed Sheeran does not disappoint us and each of his creations has a valuable contribution either for a deep thought or to create a beautiful image in our mind. He also tells us painful things and situations that many of us have experienced. A complete and universal artist: Ed Sheeran.


CONFESSION AND WELCOME



I must say that the song that opens the album, "Eraser", impressed me. A mixture of confession and welcome. Confession, because he mentions moments of his life that have been surrounded by envy, lack of faith and division. The saddest thing is that those moments that narrates in the song have been starred by him and his. The family as the center of the problem that does not let you take off, that hurts you with words of discouragement, that kills you when you see the jealousy and envy that persecute anyone who is not mediocre. I understand the pain that the artist goes through, but I also recognize in him the determination not to be submerged by mediocrity. And, like everything that does not kill, strengthens, the life and work of Ed Sheeran is increasingly robust and will surely be to give us even better things. After the confession and a kind of apology for having been absent for a while, the artist finally gives himself up to his fans and welcomes them to this new show at the end of the song. There is no doubt that from the beginning he confirms that we are facing a concept disc, a work designed to listen from beginning to end. Now, speaking of the welcome, it is inevitable for me to remember the song "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band ", which opens the album that bears the same name and was released in 1967 by the 'Fab Four' (a.k.a. The Beatles) as one of the most acclaimed albums and admired by lovers of rock and other genres for the innovations it contained , in addition to the richness of its psychedelic poetry. am not saying that the song or the lyrics are similar, what I mean is to use the resource of the welcome and introduction to the concept of the work through the first track of the album. I do not know if the album, "÷", of Sheeran has those reaches, but it is extremely encouraging to discover that such a young musician retains the influences that perhaps he heard as a child thanks to the records that his parents, uncles or grandparents kept at home. It begins with its classic resource of one or two sequenced guitars and giving all the attention to send a clear message to the audience by recording his voice several times and reproduced simultaneously and with a pristine diction, so that there is no doubt that what he matters is to start a conversation with the one on the other side of the speakers. Cool.

THERE IS A CASTLE EVERYWHERE



The second song, "Castle on The Hill", brings me to what must be one of the many influences that have nurtured Ed: U2. The introduction with that guitar of brilliant and repetitive sound that goes in crescendo while the voice of the singer appears without warning irrevocably refer me to the song "Where the Streets Have No Name", of the album, The Joshua Tree, of the Irish band. Music aside, the story is exquisite. Who has not felt that feeling when returning to the old town or neighborhood where you were born and grew up? Remember all the friends and circumstances that made you what you are today. See with pleasure what some have achieved and with sadness those who preferred to stay by the side of the road. To feel again that tickling of the loves of childhood and adolescence, parties and mischief. In the case of Sheeran the image of the “Castle on the hill” is fixed in his mind, for many of us that Castle may be another place, but, in the end, it represents the same. Although still very young, Ed Sheeran can make use of a past not too distant to connect with others who are no longer his age and still feel identified with that feeling – Throughout the album, he takes us through wonderful passages and full enjoyment, while at other times he makes us cry and sometimes get angry. That's what the wonderful profession of making music and poetry is about – It is very difficult that in these times an artist can break through commercially in the world with such quality and determination to give a preponderant place to the message he wants to convey, without being overshadowed by commercial pressures and a public with short memories. Ed Sheeran is relevant for that and that is a reason to defend his art everywhere, with the hope that he will continue to give us this for many years and also expect other musicians to be attracted to this type of artistic manifestations and have the courage to turn this industry into something more artistic and less plastic, as it was in the sixties.


By: Jorge Diaz